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What is a chest infection and what causes it? Acute bronchitis This is an infection of the large airways in the lungs (bronchi). Acute bronchitis is common and is often due to a viral infection. Infection with a germ (bacterium) is a less common cause. Pneumonia This is a serious infection of the lung. Treatment with medicines called antibiotics is usually needed. How common are chest infections? Chest infections are very common, especially during the autumn and winter. They often occur after a cold or flu. Anyone can get a chest infection but they are more common in: Young children and the elderly. People who smoke. People with long-term chest problems such as asthma. What are the symptoms of a chest infection? The main symptoms are a chesty cough, breathing difficulties and chest pain. You may also have headaches and have a high temperature (fever). The symptoms of an infection of the large airways (bronchi) in the lungs (acute bronchitis) and a serious lung infection (pneumonia) may be similar; however, pneumonia symptoms are usually more severe
EBUS lymphnode 1. Size short axis : less or more than 1cm 2. Shape : Oval or round ; when ratio of short axis vs . long axis of lymph node is smaller than 1.5cm , the lymph node defined as round. If ration more than 1..5cm it is oval. 3. Margin indistinct or distinct : if more than 50% is clearly visible with a high echoic border they are distinct . If less than 50% and margin unclear determined indistinct. 4.Echogenecity; Homogenous or heterogenous. 5. Presence or absence of central hilar structure CHS CHS defined as linear flat hyperechoic area in the center of lymph node which indicate prediction of metastatic L node
Can I prevent a chest infection? There are measures you can take to help prevent chest infection and to stop the spread of it to others. You can pass a chest infection on to others through coughing and sneezing. So if you have a chest infection, it's important to cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze and to wash your hands regularly. Throw away used tissues immediately. Immunisation against the pneumococcus germ (bacterium) - the most common cause of bacterial pneumonia - and the annual flu (influenza) virus immunisation are advised if you are at increased risk of developing these infections
Transbronchial Cryobiopsy in Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Disease: Retrospective Analysis of 74 Cases, Chest 2017, 151 (2): 400-408 Single-center cohort demonstrated a 51% diagnostic yield from TBC; the rates of pneumothorax and bleeding were 1.4% and 22%, respectively.
Sleepless while you are sleeping http://epaper.newindianexpress.com/c/6294845
Postoperative Pulmonary Complications Br J Anaesth. 2017;118(3):317-334. Changes to the respiratory system occur immediately on induction of general anaesthesia: respiratory drive and muscle function are altered, lung volumes reduced, and atelectasis develops in > 75% of patients receiving a neuromuscular blocking drug..The respiratory system may take 6 weeks to return to its preoperative state after general anaesthesia for major surgery. clinicians should be aware of non-modifiable and modifiable factors in order to recognize those at risk and optimize their care.Preventative measures include preoperative optimization of co-morbidities, smoking cessation, and correction of anaemia, in addition to intraoperative protective ventilation strategies and appropriate management of neuromuscular blocking drugs. Protective ventilation includes low tidal volumes, which must be calculated according to the patient's ideal body weight. the most beneficial level of PEEP is required,
A definitive diagnosis of pleural TB depends on the isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the sputum, pleural fluid or pleural biopsy specimens, or the demonstration of caseating granulomas in the parietal pleura. However, lymphocytic exudades with a high ADA content (>35–40 U/L) are generally accepted as tuberculous in the correct clinical context. ● When the cause of a pleural effusion remains obscure after the standard initial workup, which may eventually include pleural biopsy, medical history and all available diagnostic examinations should be revisited. Most of these effusions will resolve spontaneously
Fleischner Society Guideline Update 2017: Management of Solid Pulmonary Nodules. Updated 2017 Fleischner Society guidelines advise a less intensive approach to the management of most small pulmonary nodules incidentally discovered on CT scans. The Fleischner Society now recommends that solid nodules 6 mm or less in diameter in low-risk adults >35 years old generally need no further follow-up. In higher-risk patients, a follow-up CT scan should be considered optional. The recommendations apply even if multiple solid pulmonary nodules ≤6 mm are present.
Diagnosis of asthma–COPD overlap: the five commandments 1) A patient with asthma may develop non-fully reversible airflow obstruction but this is not COPD, not even ACO; it is obstructive asthma. 2) A patient with asthma who smokes may also develop non-fully reversible airflow obstruction, which differs from obstructive asthma and from “pure” COPD. This is the most frequent type of patient with ACO. 3) Some patients who smoke and develop COPD may have a genetic Th2 background (even in the absence of a previous history of asthma) and can be identified by high eosinophil counts in peripheral blood.These individuals could be included under the umbrella term of ACO. 4) A patient with COPD and a positive bronchodilator test (>200 mL and >12% FEV1 change) has reversible COPD but is not an asthmatic, or even ACO. 5) A patient with COPD and a very positive bronchodilator test (>400 mL FEV1 change) is more likely to have some features of asthma and could also be classified as ACO.
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