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Comprehensive and Individualized Patient Care in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Refining Approaches to Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment Implement multidisciplinary clinical and imaging approaches to achieve more timely and accurate diagnosis of IPF • Develop IPF treatment strategies based on key guideline recommendations and examine the supporting clinical trial data • Describe key elements of an individualized approach to IPF treatment that involves shared decision-making Standard immunosuppressive therapy is no longer indicated, whereas pirfenidone, nintedanib, and antacid therapy are all conditionally recommended for use. Individualizing treatment is important in light of potential improved adherence to both drug therapy and health behaviors. An early referral to an interstitial lung disease center offers the advantages of comprehensive diagnostic and disease-management expertise, potential enrollment in a clinical trial, and evaluation for transplantation.
The Treatment of Diabetes Through Improved Quality of Sleep about half of those who suffer from Type 2 diabetes suffer from obstructive sleep apnea, independent of obesity, as was previously unknown. existence of sleep apnea in diabetics creates insulin resistance and increased fasting glucose without regard to whether the patient also suffers from obesity. That is, if you suffer from sleep apnea, and it remains untreated the insulin that is vital to your quality of life, may not be working to its full potential. Further, the more severe the sleep apnea, the greater the degree of increased resistance to insulin and fasting glucose we find in your body. This validates the idea that a correlation exists between diabetes and sleep apnea. This correlation requires that treatment for diabetes be done in combination with treatment for sleep apnea so as to achieve the best results.
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a heterogeneous disorder. If left untreated, OSA has major health, safety and economic consequences. In addition to varying levels of impairment in pharyngeal anatomy (narrow/collapsible airway), non-anatomical ‘phenotypic traits’ are also important contributors to OSA for most patients. However, the majority of existing therapies only target the anatomical cause (e.g. continuous positive airway pressure [CPAP], oral appliances, weight loss, positional therapy, and upper airway surgery). These are typically administered as monotherapy according to a trial and error management approach in which the majority of patients are first prescribed CPAP. Despite its high effectiveness, CPAP adherence remains unacceptably low and second-line therapies have variable and unpredictable efficacies. Recent advances in knowledge of the multiple causes of OSA using respiratory phenotyping techniques have identified new targets or ‘treatable traits’ to direct therapy. Identification of the traits and development of therapies that selectively target one or more of the treatable traits has the potential to personalize the management of this chronic health condition to optimize patient outcomes according to precision medicine principles.
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