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Found Update results for
'targeted therapies'
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The development of biomarker-driven targeted therapy has resulted in substantial benefits for patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, and rearrangements involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene or the ROS1 gene. For patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (eg, gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib) have a superior objective response rate and progression-free survival compared with chemotherapy in the first-line setting. For patients who have disease progression on EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor and with NSCLC with an EGFR T790M mutation osimertinib has demonstrated a superior response rate and progression-free survival compared with chemotherapy in the second-line setting.4 For patients with ALK rearrangements ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (eg, crizotinib, ceritinib) have a superior response rate and progression-free survival compared with chemotherapy in the first-line setting, and for patients who experience disease progression, ceritinib and alectinib have demonstrated clinically relevant response rates and progression-free survival..For patients with ROS1 rearrangements, targeted therapy, is associated with a higher response rate and longer progression-free survival than has been observed with chemotherapy. These molecular alterations are more common in NSCLC with adenocarcinoma histology and in the minority of patients with a light smoking or never smoking history. The success of these targeted therapies in molecularly defined subsets of NSCLC made the development of targeted therapies and identification of predictive biomarkers a focus of thoracic oncology research. Routine molecular testing is now the standard of care for patients with NSCLC with adenocarcinoma histology
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a heterogeneous disorder. If left untreated, OSA has major health, safety and economic consequences. In addition to varying levels of impairment in pharyngeal anatomy (narrow/collapsible airway), non-anatomical ‘phenotypic traits’ are also important contributors to OSA for most patients. However, the majority of existing therapies only target the anatomical cause (e.g. continuous positive airway pressure [CPAP], oral appliances, weight loss, positional therapy, and upper airway surgery). These are typically administered as monotherapy according to a trial and error management approach in which the majority of patients are first prescribed CPAP. Despite its high effectiveness, CPAP adherence remains unacceptably low and second-line therapies have variable and unpredictable efficacies. Recent advances in knowledge of the multiple causes of OSA using respiratory phenotyping techniques have identified new targets or ‘treatable traits’ to direct therapy. Identification of the traits and development of therapies that selectively target one or more of the treatable traits has the potential to personalize the management of this chronic health condition to optimize patient outcomes according to precision medicine principles.
Treatment of KRAS-Mutant Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer: The End of the Beginning for Targeted Therapies
Targeted therapy in the management of severe asthma patients High T2 High esinophil count and HIGH igE They are responsive to corticosteriods and biological Low T2 Normal esnophil count and normal IgE THEY ARE POOR TO STERIODS AND POOR RESPONSE TO BIOLOGICALS
Personalised Medicine for Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are prevalent condition sboth significant heterogeneity within each of these conditions and additionally significant overlap in many of the clinical and inflammatory features useful clinical and immunological biomarkers which inform about prognosis and response to therapy have emerged in both asthma and COPD. These biomarkers will allow both better targeting of existing treatments and the identification of those patients who will respond to novel therapies which are now becoming available Delivery of precision medicine in airways disease is now feasible and is a core component of a personalised healthcare delivery in asthma and COPD
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